U.S. NRC Blog

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Animated Timeline Details the NRC Response to the Fukushima Accident

The NRC has developed an animated timeline to walk you through the major events in our response to the Japanese earthquake and tsunami of March 2011, and the resulting accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. You can also click on specific events in the timeline to get more information on our activities related to Fukushima.

The timeline is part of our redesign for the part of the NRC website devoted to the events in Japan.

The timeline lists our efforts to first monitor facilities on the U.S. West Coast and then expand our actions by supporting the U.S. aid effort in Japan. As 2011 continued (and turned into 2012), we took additional actions to ensure U.S. nuclear power plants remained safe and that the agency learned the appropriate lessons from Fukushima Dai-ichi.

We’ll continue to update the timeline and the website as we complete additional actions.

Scott Burnell
Public Affairs Officer

4 responses to “Animated Timeline Details the NRC Response to the Fukushima Accident

  1. economic essay June 18, 2012 at 8:26 am

    Hi there. Who made this timeline?

  2. Tarun June 16, 2012 at 1:42 am

    Wow. Crazy to thinkthis way only one year ago. Nice graphic.

  3. Alex June 10, 2012 at 7:15 am

    This is a timeline of the continuing Fukushima Nuclear Crisis. This part covers some history and a day-by-day account of the first 2 months of the crisis, pasting together all of the disparate sources. The editor believes that the crisis is not going to kill millions of people, but it is affecting most Japanese as even Tokyo is getting alarming if not yet definitely harmful levels of radioactive contamination, and hundreds of thousands have evacuated and lost their jobs and homes even if the official number of deaths attributed to radiation is zero, and the worst possible extrapolation including deceptive “acute lukemia” diagnoses and suicides is not worse than the small hundreds compared to the tens of thousands who drowned in the tsunami.

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