Let’s Chat – Coming Soon to the NRC

Holly Harrington
Senior Advisor
 

Picture1The NRC is expanding its social media program next week by launching a pilot of a live discussion platform known as NRC Chat. The first Chat is scheduled for April 30 at 2 p.m. EST on the subject of history of U.S. nuclear power with the NRC’s historian, Tom Wellock.

The Chat is similar to the existing NRC blog, and is also hosted on WordPress, but it features a real-time discussion. Each one-hour Chat session will focus on a specific issue with an NRC expert responding to the questions. Some sessions we hope to hold in the future will include such topics as Japan “lessons learned” activities, hurricane preparedness and “waste confidence.”

Chat addresses a key element in NRC’s Open Government Plan — enhancing the agency’s communication with the public and other stakeholders through the use of social media technologies. Information on Chat comment guidelines is here.

We’ll post the future schedule and topics soon, and will always tweet reminders. We expect to hold two Chat sessions a month for about six months. We’ll then evaluate the platform, and solicit your input.

You can submit questions early by sending them to opa.resource@nrc.gov. Please put CHAT in the subject line.

We hope to see you at the Chat!

NRC Posts Newly Digitized Historical Images on Flickr

Ivonne Couret
Public Affairs Officer
 

Are you interested in what President Jimmy Carter looked like when he toured Three Mile Island in the spring of 1979? Or see the jimmycarterchange in fashion styles of NRC engineers over the past decades?

These photos and more than 50 other newly digitized historical images have been added to the NRC’s Flickr Photostream. They are in a set called Historical Moments and coincide with the release of our new YouTube video – Moments in NRC History: Three Mile Island.

We will continue to add more historical images on a regular basis. These photos are open domain and may be used for all non-commercial purposes (although we do like a photo credit). You do not need a Flickr account to view or download the images.

To learn more about NRC photos on Flickr read our previous NRC blog post.