U.S. NRC Blog

Transparent, Participate, and Collaborate

Category Archives: General

@NRCgov_jobs Joins Twitter

Kimberly English
Recruitment Program Manager

There is a new way to hear about careers and career-related information at the NRC. Beginning today, you’ll be able to find out about the latest vacancy announcements and employment information by just following the new Twitter feed.

tweetgraphicThe tweets will go out the same time a vacancy announcement is open to the public or when we attend career fairs or just want to share information related to careers at the NRC. Follow NRC’s careers tweets at @NRCgov_jobs. The NRC’s jobs account will be listed and then simply click the “Follow” button underneath.

We also recently launched a careers page on LinkedIn where we share information on jobs and interesting factoids as well as information on why the NRC is a great place to work and seen as an employer of choice. Log into your LinkedIn account and in the search field type U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and join the more than 10,000 people following our careers page.

We don’t just hire engineers! Take a look and who knows…Your most rewarding career move could be to the NRC!

 

NRC & Your Community – The Video

Ivonne Couret
Public Affairs Officer

Every work day, 3,000+ of your friends, neighbors, relatives and community members head to their jobs at the NRC. They’re headed to one of four regional offices, our large headquarters site, our teaching facility in Tennessee or are stationed at one of the nearly 100 nuclear power plants around the country. They’re managers, technical staff, nuclear experts, lawyers, librarians, inspectors, accountants and more.

NRC & your community logo_clrThis “people” perspective is often lost in larger conversations about rulemaking, concerns about radiation, and the risks and benefits of nuclear power. But the NRC is much more than a large regulatory body. It’s an organization made up of people who care – people just like you.

So a class of the next generation of NRC leaders – called the Senior Executive Service Candidate Development Program – decided to make a video focusing on the people behind the NRC seal, and how they help support society as a whole and the communities in which they – and you – live.

So, please take a few minutes to watch the video. We’ll also be presenting this at public meetings, making it available to schools and community groups, and augmenting it with other materials as part of a broader information campaign.

CRUD: Another Acronym Bites the Dust

Thomas Wellock
Historian

Chalk River Unidentified Deposits (CRUD). The nuclear industry loves its acronyms, and the myth behind CRUD—a term for corrosion particles that become radioactive—is almost as fabled as Safety Control Rod Axe Man (SCRAM). But in reality, crud, like scram, is not an acronym at all, but popular slang appropriated by Manhattan Project personnel.

The idea that crud was an acronym came from a 1959 article by Commander E.E. Kintner. In 1953, Kintner headed the Advanced Design Group under Hyman Rickover developing the Mark I prototype reactor for the first nuclear powered submarine, the Nautilus. To verify that the reactor’s fuel elements would not corrode, Kintner recalled, samples were placed in a research reactor located at Chalk River, Canada. After several months of irradiation, the fuel elements were covered in deposits—Chalk River Unidentified Deposits. This was worrisome since the deposits might block the flow of coolant around the fuel causing them to overheat and melt. While the problem was resolved by adjusting water chemistry, “CRUD” lived on as an acronym for radioactive deposits.

Crud was a term used early by the Hanford Engineering Works. Seen here is the site’s F Reactor complex under construction. Photo courtesy of the Department of Energy

Crud was a term used early by the Hanford Engineering Works. Seen here is the site’s F Reactor complex under construction. Photo courtesy of the Department of Energy

Kintner likely did not know that by 1953 the word crud had already been in use for nearly a decade at Atomic Energy Commission facilities. The word appeared in a technical manual as early as May 1944 at in the Hanford Engineering Works in Washington State. The manual described the use of chemical treatments “to seep insoluble ‘crud’ and mud from the solution.” By 1947, “crud” was a common enough in the AEC that reports from Hanford and Oak Ridge no longer used quotation marks to describe the “crud deposition problem.”

Thus, CRUD is really an example of a backronym — where words are identified to fit the letters of an existing word.

So, why was “crud” used to describe radioactive deposits in the first place? Crud was a common word well before World War II that likely derives from the Welsh cryd, meaning disease or plague. By the early 1930s, crud became slang for unpalatable food, filth, a sloppily dressed man or an illness, as in, “I’ve got the crud.” By World War II, soldiers called any unknown illness “the crud,” and a comic book of the era featured a Corporal Crud as one of its characters.

It seems likely that the negative connotations of crud made it a fitting descriptor for contamination associated with radioactive deposits. The etymology of scram and crud, then, reveals how Manhattan Project workers tried to make sense of the uncommon new world of the atom through common language.

Spreading the Sunshine!

Stu Reiter
Co-Chair Open Government Advisory Group

Given the terrible winter much of the U.S. has been experiencing, you may be excited to learn that next week is “Sunshine Week.” But before you break out the beach towels, you should know that the week actually celebrates the public’s right to know its government’s business. In fact, this year marks the initiative’s 10th anniversary.

sunshineSunshine Week was launched by the American Society of News Editors in March 2005. This non-partisan, non-profit initiative is celebrated in mid-March each year to coincide with James Madison’s birthday on March 16.

We thought it an excellent time to highlight the NRC’s actions to be open and transparent about its business. The NRC has a long history of commitment to openness and transparency and encouraging stakeholder and public engagement. Most recently, we’ve used Web streaming and conferencing technologies to enhance public participation in our public meetings, regardless of stakeholder location. And our web-based systems make it easier to share public meeting information before and after, and for the public to provide feedback on these meetings.

And, we have embraced President Obama’s Open Government efforts to make the federal government even more open and accountable and to increase citizen participation, collaboration, and transparency in government.

In January, 2009 the President instructed OMB to issue an Open Government Directive. To comply with the directive, each agency was required to develop and publish an Open Government Plan (updated every two years) describing how it will improve transparency and integrate public participation and collaboration into its activities. NRC’s most recent plan can be found here. Examples of commitments highlighted in our plan include:

  • Reducing the average FOIA request processing time and backlog.
  • Enhancing availability and delivery of official agency information throughout the public Website.
  • Making it easier for mobile users to find/access regulatory information.
  • Continued use of Social Media to share information with the public – launching Facebook.
  • Promoting the objective of clear communications, the use of plain language.
  • Increasing the transparency of our rulemaking activities.

President Obama then went further, and in September 2010, he challenged members of the United Nations General Assembly to work together to make all governments more open and accountable to their people. To meet that challenge, in July 2011, President Obama joined the leaders of seven other nations in announcing the launch of the Open Government Partnership – a global effort to encourage transparent, effective, and accountable governance. Now, some 60 nations participate, affecting more than 2 billion people around the world.

As an organization, the NRC is dedicated to continuous improvement. We will continue to focus on what is important to our stakeholders and public — FOIA responsiveness, maintaining our public Web site as the agency’s central information portal and providing a mobile‑friendly Web site, growing our social media programs and modernizing our records management program.

Q & A with Joanne Savoy in Recognition of Black History Month

Joanne Savoy works in the NRC’s Office of International Programs as a licensing assistant for the Exports Controls and Nonproliferation Branch. She has also been the chair of the agency’s Advisory Committee for African Americans (ACAA) for the past three years.

What is the ACAA?

joanneThe ACAA is one of eight Equal Employment Opportunity Advisory Committees here at the NRC. It reports to the Office of Small Business and Civil Rights and its goal is to assist in identifying issues that may impact African American employees. We also make recommendations to address those issues.

Why does diversity matter in the NRC workplace?

Diversity matters because everyone is able to bring different points of view to the table. Many of us come from different backgrounds, and we are able to take what we have experienced — and learned in our own diversified cultures — to add value to our everyday work life. Diversity at the NRC means a new way of thinking, and a new way for all of us to interact with each other and learn from each other.

How does diversity in the workforce help the NRC meet its mission?

There are many studies that prove that when workers are ethnically and racially diverse, are educated in different parts of the country, represent multiple generations, and come from various socio-economic backgrounds they collaborate and contribute in a way that makes an organization more successful and productive in accomplishing its mission.

The NRC permanent staff is made up of:

15% African Americans
10% Asians
6% Hispanics
1% Native Americans
67% White

We come from all parts of the country; we have been educated in many different colleges and universities, and in many different disciplines (both technical and non-technical). We represent every generation across every age group. We practice many different religions and beliefs and nearly 1% of our work force is employees with disabilities. This is the diversity that makes the NRC great.

Why is Black History Month important?

Black History Month is important because it is a time to reflect on how far we have come. Black History Month is a time for EVERYONE to celebrate ALL who have fought for African American rights and freedom. Judge Alan Rosenthal, a member of the NRC’s ASLPB, was the keynote speaker at the agency’s African American History month dinner in 2013. I was surprised to learn the agency had someone who played a vital role in the historic Brown vs Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. I remember thinking how amazing it was to have met this man who had fought so hard for someone like me, so I would have the opportunities that I have today. I will never forget that moment. It made me realize how the NRC has heroes like Judge Rosenthal, who fought the fight for equal rights.

What should people make a point to do/think/reflect on during Black History Month?

We should make a point to volunteer and give back to our communities. There are people and children who need us to guide them and help them make their lives better. I also think we should continue to educate not only ourselves but our children about our history. There are so many great movies like Selma, Roots, 12 Years A Slave, Glory, The Butler, Malcom X, Road to Memphis, American Black Journal and so many more that can help the education process. We should be watching these movies and talking to our children, family and friends about what Black History Month means to us.

I am who I am because of the people — black and white — who have fought the fight for equal rights. Because of them, a woman like me is able to work here at the NRC and to have the freedom to do whatever I want. It is up to me and you to give back and continue the legacy and remember we have come a long way, but there is always more that we can do to continue with the our legacy.

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